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Project Uganda

Re-wilding degraded land and protecting endanger species

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Project Uganda

Re-wilding degraded land and protecting endanger species

parallax background

Project Uganda

Re-wilding degraded land and protecting endanger species

 

We have been working on the Uganda project since January 2020 in order to really understand the needs and be able to elaborate the best strategy that generates the most long term impact.

The project will be implemented in Busoga region Kamuli District eastern Uganda, where Deforestation was at 81% between 1990 and 2005. Over 80% of the population in this region depends on agriculture (mainly subsistence) for their livelihood, with an average household land holding of about 2.5 acres or 1.01 ha. The main crops grown include sweet potatoes, cassava, groundnuts, and soya beans among others. Sugarcane is fast becoming the main cash crop for the area which has implications for food security and environmental management. The deforestation by excessive use of fuel wood resources, encroachment on wetlands and disruption of environmentally critical ecosystems is fast leading to low agricultural yields.

 

We will establish community tree nurseries with participating farmers. Organizing +625 farmers in groups of 25, will create 25 groups. Each farmer group will establish 30,000 tree seedlings of different tree species in their nurseries to distribute to members.

We will work with 25 groups of 25 farmers, each participating farmer using at least 1 ha of their land. When the +625 farmers each plants 1,200 trees, following hamlet food forest design we can easily plant the numbers of trees we need. If we want to plant more trees it is a matter of increasing the numbers of farmers participating so this system is very scalable.

By establishing 10 nurseries of different tree species at a farmer group level of 25 farmers we can raise 30,000 seedlings and with 25 groups we can raise in nurseries about 750,000 seedlings and out-plant in ground about 600,000 trees.

Tree Nurseries will be established at a central place in the community where farmers can access them for planting on their farms.

 

Tree nursery establishment time: Dec-Feb, June-July

Out-planting seasons: March-May, August-Sept.

Some Seedlings can be out-planted after 1-2 months in nurseries while others like fruits can be planted after 3-6 months, others can be directly seeded and others can be planted by cuttings.

For sustainability purposes we have concluded that using agroforestry practice and employ a 3 systems approach of planting at each farmer’s 1 ha garden. After a deep study and understanding of the local practices we believe that this is the system that would generate the most long term beneficial impact for both the environment and the local communities as this will prevent them to keep chopping the few remaining forests. This will allow the recuperation of tree areas as well as provide the local communities with their needs. If this does not meet the Ecosia criteria, we could plant just for conservation purposes but not fixing the real issue on the long term. By implementing this system we can constantly scale the project and once we have sustainably solved their needs the impact in conservation would grow exponentially.

The 3 approaches include:

  1. Fast growing trees including: Leucaena leucocephala, Calliandra calothyrsus, Sesbanian sesban, Gliricidia sepium, Moringa Oliefera,These will meet the immediate and short time needs of farmers like firewood, fodder green manure, and green wall for their land protection.
  2. Fruits trees including: Cashew nuts Sour soap Avocados Mangoes Jackfruit and Cinnamon, these will contribute to food security income and conservational needs.
  3. Timber trees including: Measopsis eminii, Grevillea robusta, Acrocarpyus fraxinifolis, Albizia chinesis and Cedrella adorate, contributing to conservation,timber and soil improvement.

We propose these trees because they are socially acceptable, being planted and grown well in the area, the other reason is because they are valued for producing timber in the long run for the farmers to get income.

Generated impact:

  • Greening the community contributing to climate change mitigation.
  • Generating a source of income for +2,000 farmers, their families and their communities.
  • Food security through planting fruit trees.
  • Fodder production for livestock.
  • Firewood production by reducing dependency on existing forests.
  • Improve soil quality through agroforestry tree planting practices.
  • Protecting farmers land through boundary tree planting.
  • Protecting and reintroducing wildlife in the planting areas.

We have been working on the Uganda project since January 2020 in order to really understand the needs and be able to elaborate the best strategy that generates the most long term impact.

The project will be implemented in Busoga region Kamuli District eastern Uganda, where Deforestation was at 81% between 1990 and 2005. Over 80% of the population in this region depends on agriculture (mainly subsistence) for their livelihood, with an average household land holding of about 2.5 acres or 1.01 ha. The main crops grown include sweet potatoes, cassava, groundnuts, and soya beans among others. Sugarcane is fast becoming the main cash crop for the area which has implications for food security and environmental management. The deforestation by excessive use of fuel wood resources, encroachment on wetlands and disruption of environmentally critical ecosystems is fast leading to low agricultural yields.

We will establish community tree nurseries with participating farmers. Organizing +625 farmers in groups of 25, will create 25 groups. Each farmer group will establish 30,000 tree seedlings of different tree species in their nurseries to distribute to members.

We will work with 25 groups of 25 farmers, each participating farmer using at least 1 ha of their land. When the +625 farmers each plants 1,200 trees, following hamlet food forest design we can easily plant the numbers of trees we need. If we want to plant more trees it is a matter of increasing the numbers of farmers participating so this system is very scalable.

By establishing 10 nurseries of different tree species at a farmer group level of 25 farmers we can raise 30,000 seedlings and with 25 groups we can raise in nurseries about 750,000 seedlings and out-plant in ground about 600,000 trees.

Tree Nurseries will be established at a central place in the community where farmers can access them for planting on their farms.

Tree nursery establishment time: Dec-Feb, June-July

Out-planting seasons: March-May, August-Sept.

Some Seedlings can be out-planted after 1-2 months in nurseries while others like fruits can be planted after 3-6 months, others can be directly seeded and others can be planted by cuttings.

For sustainability purposes we have concluded that using agroforestry practice and employ a 3 systems approach of planting at each farmer’s 1 ha garden. After a deep study and understanding of the local practices we believe that this is the system that would generate the most long term beneficial impact for both the environment and the local communities as this will prevent them to keep chopping the few remaining forests. This will allow the recuperation of tree areas as well as provide the local communities with their needs. If this does not meet the Ecosia criteria, we could plant just for conservation purposes but not fixing the real issue on the long term. By implementing this system we can constantly scale the project and once we have sustainably solved their needs the impact in conservation would grow exponentially.

The 3 approaches include:

  1. Fast growing trees including: Leucaena leucocephala, Calliandra calothyrsus, Sesbanian sesban, Gliricidia sepium, Moringa Oliefera,These will meet the immediate and short time needs of farmers like firewood, fodder green manure, and green wall for their land protection.
  2. Fruits trees including: Cashew nuts Sour soap Avocados Mangoes Jackfruit and Cinnamon, these will contribute to food security income and conservational needs.
  3. Timber trees including: Measopsis eminii, Grevillea robusta, Acrocarpyus fraxinifolis, Albizia chinesis and Cedrella adorate, contributing to conservation,timber and soil improvement.

We propose these trees because they are socially acceptable, being planted and grown well in the area, the other reason is because they are valued for producing timber in the long run for the farmers to get income.

Generated impact:

  • Greening the community contributing to climate change mitigation.
  • Generating a source of income for +2,000 farmers, their families and their communities.
  • Food security through planting fruit trees.
  • Fodder production for livestock.
  • Firewood production by reducing dependency on existing forests.
  • Improve soil quality through agroforestry tree planting practices.
  • Protecting farmers land through boundary tree planting.
  • Protecting and reintroducing wildlife in the planting areas.

Trees to be planted

800000


Hectares restored

800


Since

2021

We have been working on the Uganda project since January 2020 in order to really understand the needs and be able to elaborate the best strategy that generates the most long term impact.

The project will be implemented in Busoga region Kamuli District eastern Uganda, where Deforestation was at 81% between 1990 and 2005. Over 80% of the population in this region depends on agriculture (mainly subsistence) for their livelihood, with an average household land holding of about 2.5 acres or 1.01 ha. The main crops grown include sweet potatoes, cassava, groundnuts, and soya beans among others. Sugarcane is fast becoming the main cash crop for the area which has implications for food security and environmental management. The deforestation by excessive use of fuel wood resources, encroachment on wetlands and disruption of environmentally critical ecosystems is fast leading to low agricultural yields.

We will establish community tree nurseries with participating farmers. Organizing +625 farmers in groups of 25, will create 25 groups. Each farmer group will establish 30,000 tree seedlings of different tree species in their nurseries to distribute to members.

We will work with 25 groups of 25 farmers, each participating farmer using at least 1 ha of their land. When the +625 farmers each plants 1,200 trees, following hamlet food forest design we can easily plant the numbers of trees we need. If we want to plant more trees it is a matter of increasing the numbers of farmers participating so this system is very scalable.

By establishing 10 nurseries of different tree species at a farmer group level of 25 farmers we can raise 30,000 seedlings and with 25 groups we can raise in nurseries about 750,000 seedlings and out-plant in ground about 600,000 trees.

Tree Nurseries will be established at a central place in the community where farmers can access them for planting on their farms.

Tree nursery establishment time: Dec-Feb, June-July

Out-planting seasons: March-May, August-Sept.

Some Seedlings can be out-planted after 1-2 months in nurseries while others like fruits can be planted after 3-6 months, others can be directly seeded and others can be planted by cuttings.

For sustainability purposes we have concluded that using agroforestry practice and employ a 3 systems approach of planting at each farmer’s 1 ha garden. After a deep study and understanding of the local practices we believe that this is the system that would generate the most long term beneficial impact for both the environment and the local communities as this will prevent them to keep chopping the few remaining forests. This will allow the recuperation of tree areas as well as provide the local communities with their needs. If this does not meet the Ecosia criteria, we could plant just for conservation purposes but not fixing the real issue on the long term. By implementing this system we can constantly scale the project and once we have sustainably solved their needs the impact in conservation would grow exponentially.

 

The 3 approaches include:

  1. Fast growing trees including: Leucaena leucocephala, Calliandra calothyrsus, Sesbanian sesban, Gliricidia sepium, Moringa Oliefera,These will meet the immediate and short time needs of farmers like firewood, fodder green manure, and green wall for their land protection.
  2. Fruits trees including: Cashew nuts Sour soap Avocados Mangoes Jackfruit and Cinnamon, these will contribute to food security income and conservational needs.
  3. Timber trees including: Measopsis eminii, Grevillea robusta, Acrocarpyus fraxinifolis, Albizia chinesis and Cedrella adorate, contributing to conservation,timber and soil improvement.

We propose these trees because they are socially acceptable, being planted and grown well in the area, the other reason is because they are valued for producing timber in the long run for the farmers to get income.

Generated impact:

  • Greening the community contributing to climate change mitigation.
  • Generating a source of income for +2,000 farmers, their families and their communities.
  • Food security through planting fruit trees.
  • Fodder production for livestock.
  • Firewood production by reducing dependency on existing forests.
  • Improve soil quality through agroforestry tree planting practices.
  • Protecting farmers land through boundary tree planting.
  • Protecting and reintroducing wildlife in the planting areas.
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Partners

Trees4Humanity

Planting method

Nurseries, education and agroforestry

Planting season

Nurseries: Dec-Feb, Jun-Jul Planting: Mar-May, Aug-Sep

Main threats

Masive deforestation

Wildlife protected

Chimpanzees, black rhino, gorila

Challenges

Population growth, sugarcane
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Partners

Trees4Humanity

Planting method

Nurseries, education and agroforestry

Planting season

Nurseries: Dec-Feb, Jun-Jul Planting: Mar-May, Aug-Sep

Main threats

Masive deforestation

Wildlife protected

Chimpanzees, black rhino, gorila

Challenges

Population growth, sugarcane
 

Top trees species

  • Measopsis eminii
  • Grevillea robusta
  • Acrocarpyus fraxinifolis
  • Albizia chinesis
  • Cedrella adorate
  • Prunus africana
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